From the above example, you can picture the roles played by marketing automation and CRM. The former is to create awareness of your products and services while the latter is to set up or prepare for purchase. They are separate roles but at the same time complementary, unifying the two funnels that make up the buyer’s journey. Below you can see the stages in the sales pipeline that are handled by marketing automation and CRM.
If you're running a brick-and-mortar business—say, a hotel, restaurant, or store, or even an in-person service company like a law firm or repair team—website visitors might not be your most important lead source. You'll likely have far more people calling your business to check about your opening hours, current prices, and more. CallTrackingMetrics is designed exactly for that.
First, let’s be clear about the distinction between sales and marketing roles: you wouldn’t believe how many companies scramble the definitions.  As a card-carrying marketing guy (yes, I made it to Sr. VP at publicly-traded companies), I maintain that the outbound part of marketing (the real users of marketing automation) needs to focus on getting the right message out to the right prospects.  People who respond with the right level of interest are handed off to sales for qualification, and people who don’t are kept in the system for cultivation and “re-marketing.” Outbound marketing is also involved in the care and feeding of existing customers, to cultivate loyalty and repeat business.

CRM Magazine, the leading publication of the industry, recognized bpm'online as a Leader in the Midmarket CRM Suite and Sales Force Automation categories, as well as named the One to Watch in the Enterprise CRM Suite in the CRM Market Awards 2018. This is the fourth year in a row that bpm'online made it onto the leaderboard in the Midmarket CRM Suite category, with superb scores all around.


If you run a small business, you probably wear a lot of different hats. Often there's little time to think about drawing traffic to your site, growing your following, or selling your stuff—even if it is vital to your success. Marketing automation is software that handles these tasks for you. Instead of creating a one-off campaign every time you need to talk to your customers—via emails or your social media channels—you can set up automations, and never have to worry about customers slipping through the cracks. Learn the basics of marketing automation. Learn the basics of marketing automation.

Finding Friday specializes in CRM for the Travel and Leisure Industry. The company strives to connect travel and leisure companies with potential travelers and tourists. Their primary need was to integrate marketing automation tools so their clients to whom the solution was sold could run successful marketing campaigns, nurture leads along the sales cycle, and reach out to more customers in less time with little effort. MailChimp, Act-On and Insteller integrations were done with SugarCRM. You can read the complete process in our Finding Friday Case Study.
Google Analytics can show you what pages are being looked at in real time, along with detailed info about the browsers used, exit pages clicked, and how long people are on your site. You can even use it to see—to a certain degree, at least—which keywords and content styles perform best. HubSpot gives you that same info, along with the tools you need to create great landing pages, blog posts, and more, plus CRM tools that'll help you identify your customers and continue your marketing efforts.
The consequence is that marketers begin buying lists of email addresses to nurture instead of generating inbound leads. While it seems like a quick fix, it's not a long-term solution, nor does it create the fertile ground for a healthier, longer relationship with your future customers. In our plant analogy, it's sort of like using artificial chemicals or enhancers to make your plant grow faster. Sure, it seems like a good, quick fix--but it doesn't set you up for future, long-term success.  
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