Tirena is a Managing Senior Analyst for Gartner Digital Markets. She graduated from Christopher Newport University with a Writing Intensive BS in Biology with a focus in genetics, obtained a Masters in Public Health from George Mason University, a Writing Certificate from the University of Cambridge and a Marketing Certificate from Georgetown University. Follow her on @TJDingeldein for insights on marketing, data science, and startups. 																		

These are just some of the amazing features you'll find when using marketing automation software. As a result, it's important for you to determine your most needed features before making a purchase decision. None of the tools we tested are bad. In fact, each of them will provide you with more power than your standard email marketing platform will. However, some are better than others, some are more expensive, and some do a better job letting you customize your workflows to suit your specific needs.
Through integration, you can have a unified approach to data management as all the contact, communication and other informational data is saved under one single platform. The data is organized, easy to view and edit, and faster to analyze. Also, a centralized data system means that new data is easy to input and organize, and tracking and reporting of data becomes efficient.
For true Greenfield installations, however, it is actually best to have the CRM system perform the marketing automation functions.  While buying best of breed for each system has advantages, if a feature really is valuable the CRM vendor will eventually implement it.  So in the medium to long term, the costs of integration and database synchronization for separate best of breed systems is typically more trouble than it’s worth.

When you create automated emails, you can keep customers engaged without the hassle of sending messages one by one. But how do you automate outreach without losing authenticity? It's easier than you might think. Mailchimp makes it a breeze to wish customers happy birthday or to say thank you for a purchase. By creating customized, targeted emails that send when triggered by a specific date, event, or activity, you can send thoughtful messages that match the look and feel of your brand and resonate with your customers. Check out these best practices for sending automated emails that really click.
If you run a small business, you probably wear a lot of different hats. Often there's little time to think about drawing traffic to your site, growing your following, or selling your stuff—even if it is vital to your success. Marketing automation is software that handles these tasks for you. Instead of creating a one-off campaign every time you need to talk to your customers—via emails or your social media channels—you can set up automations, and never have to worry about customers slipping through the cracks. Learn the basics of marketing automation. Learn the basics of marketing automation.

You can have the world’s savviest marketing plan in place and customers still don’t always click on something the first time they see it. Whether they encounter your ads on Facebook, Instagram, or another channel, they may not make a purchase until they've seen what you've got through multiple avenues. That's where Google remarketing ads come into play. Google remarketing ads help you reach people who have expressed interest in your products—wherever they go online—and bring them back to your store when they’re ready to buy. Using these best practices and Mailchimp's powerful reporting tools, you can run retargeting ads that pay off.
It'll capture your customer leads, no matter where they come from, and give you the marketing automation tools to follow up with each of them to close the sale. You can even follow up automatically with the medium they originally used to get in touch, automatically calling back with a recording, sending an SMS, or putting together a customized email depending on their info.
First, let’s be clear about the distinction between sales and marketing roles: you wouldn’t believe how many companies scramble the definitions.  As a card-carrying marketing guy (yes, I made it to Sr. VP at publicly-traded companies), I maintain that the outbound part of marketing (the real users of marketing automation) needs to focus on getting the right message out to the right prospects.  People who respond with the right level of interest are handed off to sales for qualification, and people who don’t are kept in the system for cultivation and “re-marketing.” Outbound marketing is also involved in the care and feeding of existing customers, to cultivate loyalty and repeat business.
When the two functions combine, marketing and sales departments work as a single unit.  Marketing sells (creating visibility) on a large scale, while sales markets in a one-on-one fashion, using the information-sharing and persuasion tactics. With sales and marketing working so closely, there’s a clear value in getting the two divisions on the same page, and working in even more alignment. For small businesses, that’s particularly important as getting the best out of one single lead is crucial.
Marketing automation creates relevant content and messaging at scale across many channels. Send email messages with dynamic content that personalizes far beyond sticking a customer’s first name in the subject line. Integrate mobile messaging with your email and social campaigns through SMS/MMS, push notifications, and group messaging. Generate digital ads that appear for the right person at the right time. Plus, recommend the right products on your website for each individual user — automatically.
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